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How many treatments does vein removal take?

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Video Overview

How many treatments does vein removal take? When patients come in to be evaluated for their varicose veins, we first perform an ultrasound in the office with the patient in a standing position. If the varicose veins are caused by a reflux in the greater saphenous vein, and by reflux we mean flow in two directions as opposed to on direction up to the leg which is normal, then this needs to be addressed. We address this by which we call an endovenous ablation. This procedure has taken the place of the previously performed vein stripping. The saphenous vein which is a superficial vein and therefore an expandable vein is mapped out using the ultrasound. The vein is then accessed using ultrasound guidance by sticking the vein in the needle, putting the laser fiber of the need inside of the vein. We turn on the laser, and as we pull the laser back slowly, the heat closes the vein. The varicose veins will then shrink, and we wait to watch just to see how much they shrink. If there are residual small veins present, then we perform what is called a microphlebectomy. This is performed using local anesthesia again in an office setting. Usually, this can be done in one procedure. If there are extensive ones that are still present, this may require two procedures. This can be spaced one to two days apart. The complication rates from these procedures are extremely low. The results are good, and the patient can resume normal activity immediately.

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